History of the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine

First located in downtown Cleveland’s Republic Building, the Ohio College of Chiropody made two moves before embarking on the construction of its own building in University Circle in 1932. Needing only a high school diploma for admittance, the class of 1917 graduated after completing an eight-month course. By 1932, the curriculum had evolved into a three-year program, and, in 1938 the College added the requirement of undergraduate coursework before admittance. Over time, the profession standardized the educational requirements and curriculum among all its schools, until in 1948, a podiatric education began requiring four years of study and clinical work.

Eventually, the profession and the College began to use the term Podiatry instead of Chiropody and, in 1969 the College officially began using the name Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine. Looking for more space and updated educational and clinical facilities, in 1976, the College moved to Carnegie Avenue in Cleveland. In 1990, the College built a freestanding, state-of-the-art Cleveland Foot and Ankle Clinic.

One of nine podiatry schools in the United States, the College has maintained excellence in medical education and technology. After deciding whether to renovate or relocate, in 2007, the College purchased and remodeled its 23 acre current home in Independence, Ohio, and opened a new clinic on Euclid Avenue in Cleveland. Needing a larger clinic, in 2012 the College opened a new facility at 7000 Euclid Avenue in an area known as Cleveland’s Health-Tech Corridor.

For several years, the College pursued appropriate partners with which to align, affiliate or merge. That goal was achieved on July 1, 2012, when the Ohio College of Podiatric Medicine merged with Kent State University. The first podiatry school affiliated with a public university, the merger offers opportunities of dual degrees, inter-professional education, research, and access to sports teams to expand the sports medicine curriculum.

Having graduated over 6,500 students, the College has begun a new chapter as part of Kent State, Northeast Ohio’s leading public research university, and one of the top 200 universities in the world.